Skip Header

You are using a version of browser that may not display all the features of this website. Please consider upgrading your browser.

The evolution of the thrombospondin gene family.

Lawler J., Duquette M., Urry L., McHenry K., Smith T.F.

Thrombospondin-1 is an adhesive glycoprotein that is involved in cellular attachment, spreading, migration, and proliferation. To date, four genes have been identified that encode for the members of the thrombospondin gene family. These four genes are homologous to each other in the EGF-like (type 2) repeats, the calcium-binding (type 3) motifs, and the COOH-terminal. The latter has been reported to be a cell-binding domain in thrombospondin-1. Phylogenetic trees have been constructed from the multisequence alignment of thrombospondin sequences from human, mouse, chicken, and frog. Two different algorithms generate comparable results in terms of the topology and the branch lengths. The analysis indicates that an early form of the thrombospondin gene duplicated about 925 million years ago. The gene duplication that produced the thrombospondin-1 and -2 branches of the family is predicted to have occurred 583 million years ago, whereas the gene duplication that produced the thrombospondin-3 and -4 branches of the family is predicted to have occurred 644 million years ago. These results indicate that the members of the thrombospondin gene family have existed throughout the evolution of the animal kingdom and thus probably participate in functions that are common to most of its members.

J. Mol. Evol. 36:509-516(1993) [PubMed] [Europe PMC]

UniProt is an ELIXIR core data resource
Main funding by: National Institutes of Health

We'd like to inform you that we have updated our Privacy Notice to comply with Europe’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that applies since 25 May 2018.

Do not show this banner again