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Definition

A primary amyloidosis characterized by localized cutaneous amyloid deposition. This condition usually presents with itching (especially on the lower legs) and visible changes of skin hyperpigmentation and thickening that may be exacerbated by chronic scratching and rubbing. Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis is often divided into macular and lichen subtypes although many affected individuals often show both variants coexisting. Lichen amyloidosis characteristically presents as a pruritic eruption of grouped hyperkeratotic papules with a predilection for the shins, calves, ankles and dorsa of feet and thighs. Papules may coalesce to form hyperkeratotic plaques that can resemble lichen planus, lichen simplex or nodular prurigo. Macular amyloidosis is characterized by small pigmented macules that may merge to produce macular hyperpigmentation, sometimes with a reticulate or rippled pattern. In macular and lichen amyloidosis, amyloid is deposited in the papillary dermis in association with grouped colloid bodies, thought to represent degenerate basal keratinocytes. The amyloid deposits probably reflect a combination of degenerate keratin filaments, serum amyloid P component, and deposition of immunoglobulins. PLCA3 inheritance is autosomal recessive.

Acronym

PLCA3

Synonyms

ACD
Amyloidosis cutis dyschromica

Keywords

Amyloidosis

 
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Any medical or genetic information present in this entry is provided for research, educational and informational purposes only. It is not in any way intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Our staff consists of biologists and biochemists that are not trained to give medical advice.

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